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Caregivers Resources: General Materials & Services

Being a Caregiver

For Caregivers, Family and Friends - Alzheimer's Disease and Healthy Aging: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (cdc.gov)

"Caregivers provide care to people who need some degree of ongoing assistance with everyday tasks on a regular or daily basis. The recipients of care can live either in residential or institutional settings, range from children to older adults, and have chronic illnesses or disabling conditions."


Caregiving 101: On Being A Caregiver - Family Caregiver Alliance: National Center on Caregiving (FCA) (caregiver.org)

"Caregivers can be spouses, partners, adult children, parents, other relatives (siblings, aunts, nieces/nephews, in-laws, grandchildren), friends, neighbors. ...
You may be employed full or part-time. You may be raising children, or be a volunteer, a spouse, have other family commitments. ...You might need to navigate social service systems, call doctors while you’re at work, advocate for the care receiver, and take care of their day-to-day needs, while you try to do all of those same things for yourself and your family.

Covid-19 Resources

COVID-19

 Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov
 Get the latest research information from NIH: https://www.nih.gov/coronavirus

For updated information on Covid-19 in NY State and Dutchess County take a look at ​[PPLD's] e-Resources on Consumer Health: General Health (tab).

Caregiving Basics

Caregivers (medlineplus.gov)

  • Caregiving (nextavenue.org) - Read the latest in Caregiving. Using the dropdown menu choose from: Caregiving Support and Resources -- End of Life -- Home Care -- Housing and Assisted Living -- Long-Term Care Finance -- Social Services.

  • The Caregiver's Handbook (edumed.org) - A comprehensive guide with tools, resources, and in-depth solutions to some of caregiving’s toughest challenges.


New York State Caregiving & Respite Coalition (nyscrc.org)

Respite is planned or emergency care provided  to a child or adult with special needs in order to provide temporary relief to family caregivers who are caring for that child or adult.

Assistance can be offered by: government agencies, nonprofits, employers.

 

Caregiver Action Network (caregiveraction.org)


Caregivers Selfcare Assessment Resources -

 

Benefits of Sleep and Exercise -

Caregiver's Guide to Sleep (purple.com)

 

A Caregiver's Guide to Alzheimer's and Sleep (sleepopolis.com)

Shared recommendations caregivers can follow to improve the sleep of people under their care and actionable tips for caregivers to follow and better their own sleep quality.

 

Exercising for Better Sleep Johns Hopkins Medicine (hopkinsmedicine.org)

**Click on the ElderCare & Terminal Illness tab to read the article "A Guide to Exercise for Seniors" provided by MattressClarity.com.


How Social Work Can Reduce Healthcare Costs (mastersinsocialworkonline.org)

Social workers have long known and been vocal advocates that their services are not just another expense in the healthcare system, but rather spending funds on social work services both decreases overall healthcare costs and improves outcomes for patients. The rest of the world and various healthcare systems are finally starting to take notice of the multiple benefits of providing social work services to patients and caregivers.

Read an article written by Dr. Alyssa Middleton about the current state of healthcare spending and what medical care looks like when social determinants of health are not addressed. In addition, the critical services that social workers provide, along with case studies of their effectiveness for different populations, are discussed.

Medical Alert Systems

Guide to Getting a Free or Reduced-Price Medical Alert System (ncoa.org)


How To Get a Medical Alert Bracelet For Free (payingforseniorcare.com)

Some hospitals provide free medical alert bracelets, and it’s worth calling the hospitals in your area. If a hospital doesn’t offer that service, ask if they can refer you to a local foundation or agency that provides medical alert bracelets free or at a discount. If you’re a veteran, be sure to check with the local veteran’s hospital and with any veteran’s service agencies in the area. Your family doctor may also have some tips on finding a free medical alert bracelet.


Medical Alert Systems -

Extension Services

The Poughkeepsie Public Library District offers extension services to patrons who are unable to get to the library. The service is by application and certification. Individuals (or their caregivers) who are interested in home visits should print the application and submit it to the Library District.


Applicants must be residents of the City or Town of Poughkeepsie. Certification must be completed. All patron records are confidential. 

  • The application takes 1-7 days to process.
  • Once approved, William Ahlbach or Veronica Martin-Follette will be in contact to arrange the first visit and ask if they should bring any library materials with them.
  • During that visit a library card can be issued if the patron does not already have one.
  • Deliveries are made weekly.

For additional questions please contact either:

Name: Phone: Email:

William 

Ahlbach

1-845-485-3445, 

x3401

wahlbach

@poklib.org

Veronica Martin-Follette

1-845-485-3445, 

x3412

vmartin-follette@poklib.org

Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC)

The DISCOVER OPAC - Search and request materials available in the Mid-Hudson Library System (MHLS)'s member libraries.

Books - General Resources

[Click on the title to see if other formats are also available.]

Videos - General Resources